Fog or water got in my watch. What should I do?

Updated 4 months ago by Esti Chazanow


Condensation can form in certain situations - in situations of rapid temperature changes, or when the crown is not completely closed in environments with a lot of steam or water. Condensation should go away on its own, as long as you keep the crown tightly closed and screwed in.

If the condensation in your watch does not seem to be disappearing after a week (or) if the watch has water inside of it:

If you live in the US, you'll need to send it in for service so that we can run a water pressure test for you.

If you live outside the US, you can send the watch in for service so that we can run a water pressure test on it.  You can optionally take your watch to a local reputable jeweler and have them run a water pressure test at your own expense before sending to us.  If you choose to do this, please contact us with the results of the test before sending the watch in for service and we will advise further.  

If the outcome of the water pressure test demonstrates that the crown had been closed at the time of exposure to water or extreme temperature changes, the watch will be covered under our five-year warranty.

If your crown was not closed properly when your watch was exposed to water or extreme temperature changes, it would not be covered under warranty.

When we receive the watch, we will conduct the same water pressure test conducted during our quality control process.  We will make sure that when the watch is completely sealed, it is resistant to water.  If the test shows that when the crown is correctly pushed in (and screwed in if applicable) the watch fails to be resistant to water, then we will service the watch for you, under warranty.  If the test shows that the watch is resistant to water, then we will offer you a "Crash Replacement" watch, the same watch at a steeply discounted rate.  





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